This page is no longer updated, for the most up-to-date advice, please visit www.citizensadvice.org.uk
December 2022
This time of year is always so expensive, with presents to buy and heating bills going up. I’ve seen offers for ‘Buy Now Pay Later’ when I’m doing online shopping. It seems like a good way to spread the cost of some of the things I need to get for my family but how can I make sure I don’t get into debt?
 
With everything getting more expensive, this is a really difficult time for a lot of people, so it’s  sensible to be thinking about how you can manage. There are lots of things you can do to try and stay in control of your money.
 
Before you start spending, work out exactly what money you have coming in and going out each month. Be realistic about what you need for essentials like food and travel. Take a look at the budgeting tool on the Citizens Advice website. This can help you set a budget you can stick to.
 
You’ll also be able to find tips on how to reduce your regular living costs, which might be helpful if you’re struggling to keep within your budget.
 
While it can be tempting to split payments with schemes like Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL), you’ll need a plan to pay the money back. If you're using something like that repeatedly, you might be managing for now, but it could also be a sign that it's unaffordable in the long run. Keep a record of how much you owe in total.
 
Always make sure you understand what you’re signing up for, how you’ll make the repayments and what will happen if you can’t pay on time. It’s important to check the returns process for both the retailer and credit provider. Paying through BNPL may also affect the cost of postage returns if you’ve ordered online. The riskiest thing about it is that you’re not guaranteed to be protected if something goes wrong. For example, you can’t go to the Financial Ombudsman Service if you have a complaint.
 
If you find yourself turning to credit cards, your overdraft, or store cards for your spending, keep track of what you owe. You should prioritise paying your rent or mortgage, plus energy bills and Council Tax first, because not paying these has the most serious consequences. On the Citizens Advice website, you can find information on what bills to prioritise and how to manage debts. There’s also information on the support available for paying these and other bills.
 
If, like many during this crisis, you find you can't afford to reduce your debts after paying your priority bills and essentials, seek advice as soon as possible. If you need specific support or don’t feel able to manage your situation alone, call our debt helpline: 0800 240 4420.
 
Everyone’s circumstances are different, particularly when it comes to managing personal finances. Our advisers are here to help you find a way forward.
 
Contact your local Citizens Advice on freephone 0800 144 8848 
Lines are open Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm (closed on bank holidays and over the festive period); or you can email us
 
Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website

November 2022 
Last year I fell for a scam when I was doing my Christmas shopping. The scam was clever. I thought I was getting a good deal but didn't realise I was being scammed until it was too late. How can I avoid the same thing happening again this year?
 
Scammers’ tactics become more sophisticated every year, making scams tricky to recognise, but there are things you can look out for.
 
If it seems too good to be true, it probably is. For example, tickets to an event that are much cheaper than they’re being sold elsewhere, or a holiday that’s a lot less than you’d expect to pay.
 
Be wary of people contacting you out of the blue on social media sites or via text and email offering an item for sale or deal on something.
 
Do your research. If you’re buying from a website you haven’t used before, spend a few minutes researching it. A good place to start is finding a website’s terms and conditions. You should also look up the company’s address, this can normally be found in the website’s ‘contact us’ section and should have a street name, not just a post office box. If it’s a registered UK company you can check its details on the Companies House website.
 
Check to see what people have said about the company. It’s worth looking at different review websites to see other people’s feedback – don’t rely on reviews the company has put on its own website.
 
Scammers will often ask you to pay in an unusual way, or very quickly. For example, you’re asked to send money through a transfer service like MoneyGram or Western Union or pay via vouchers.
 
Remember never give away your personal information like a password or PIN and never click on or download anything you don't trust.
 
To find out about scams across the country, you can sign up to the Trading Standards email alert on their website.
 
If you've been scammed, there are organisations you should report the scam to. 
 
If you’ve transferred money in the last 24 hours, speak to your bank and the police. You should also contact the police if the scammer is in your area or you feel unsafe. You can also report the scam to Citizens Advice and Action Fraud.
 
Don't feel embarrassed about reporting a scam – scammers are clever and it can happen to anyone.
 
Reporting a scam helps track down and stop scammers, helping to prevent it from happening to others too. 
 
Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website

October 2022
The cost of things just keeps going up. The food shop doesn’t stretch as far and my bills just keep getting higher. I’ve made cutbacks and, at the moment, I’m just about managing but I’m really worried about how I’ll cope as it starts getting colder. What should I do?
 
You’re not alone in struggling with rising costs, but it’s important to know there is support available.
 
If you’re finding it hard to stay on top of bills, make sure you know what money you’ve got coming in and out each month. Citizens Advice has an online budgeting tool that can help with this.
 
It’s also worth finding out if you’re eligible for any benefits or support with your energy and living costs. On the Citizens Advice website there’s a benefits calculator, advice on how to reduce living costs and information on other ways to increase your income.
 
The good news is there is help with rising energy bills. From October 1 2022, there’s a limit on gas and electricity prices for most households - this is called the Energy Price Guarantee and it is in place until April 2023. The Energy Price Guarantee limits the amount energy suppliers can charge per kilowatt of gas or electricity and the average energy bill shouldn't be more than £2,500 per year but your bill will be determined by how much energy you use. Your bill could be more than £2,500.
 
From October you’ll also get £400 off your electricity bill. This is called the Energy Bills Support Scheme. 
 
You don’t need to do anything to get the money and you won’t have to pay it back. The money will be paid in six instalments, you’ll get £66 in October and November followed by £67 in December, January, February and March.
 
You should automatically receive the energy discount if you pay by direct debit, standard credit or payment card.
 
If you have a prepayment meter that isn’t a smart meter, you’ll get the discount via vouchers or as an automatic credit when you top up at your usual top-up point. Your supplier will let you know how they will issue it.
 
If you have a smart prepayment meter, the credit should be automatically added to your meter.
 
If you can’t pay your bills, speak to your energy supplier as they have a responsibility to help you come up with a solution.
 
Remember, if you need personalised support, contact your local Citizens Advice on freephone 0800 144 8848 
Lines are open Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm (closed on bank holidays); or you can email us
 
Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website
September 2022
My oldest child is starting school this month and, with uniforms and PE kits, the costs are already mounting. The school we got into isn’t within walking distance so I now need to budget for bus money five days a week too. We’re already pretty stretched, so I’m not sure how to cover these new costs. Is there any extra help I can get?
 
The start of a school year can be tough for many people’s budgets, so you’re not alone in your worries. But there is help available.
 
On the Citizens Advice website, we have lots of information on the support you might be entitled to for school-related costs. If you’re claiming benefits it’s worth checking if you can get extra help for things like school lunches, transport and uniforms.
 
Children in Reception, Year 1 and Year 2 automatically get free school meals. For older children, you can apply for free school meals if you claim certain types of benefits. The full list is available on the Citizens Advice website, and includes Universal Credit, Child Tax Credit and Income Support.

You’ve mentioned you’re worried about transport costs. For children aged five to 16, your local education authority might be able to offer free or discounted transport if you’re not able to walk to the school. Contact them directly to find out how they can support you.
 
Your local education authority might also help you with activity and school uniform costs, if you’re on a low income. You’re probably considered to be on a low income if you get means-tested benefits like Universal Credit or Housing Benefit. There are also some local charitable schemes that can help - check with your school, as they will usually know if these kinds of schemes are in your area. Schools can sometimes also advise on finding cheap or free secondhand uniforms.
 
If your child is disabled or has a health condition, you can also claim Disability Living Allowance (this isn’t means-tested).
 
A lot of peoples’ budgets are feeling the squeeze at the moment, but it’s important to remember that help is available with starting school costs.
If you need any further information or advice, contact us on freephone: 0800 144 8848.
Lines are open Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm (closed on bank holidays); or you can email us
 
Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website

August 2022
The cost of energy and food is so high now. With the kids home from school for the summer, I’m having to pay more for lunches and snacks. I’m worried about how I’ll put food on the table. I’m on a prepayment meter and I’m really scared we’re going to be left without any gas or electric if I can’t top up. What can I do?
 
First of all, I’m really sorry to hear how tough things have been for you. You’re doing the right thing in reaching out for support and there are things you can get help with.
 
As a prepayment meter customer, your energy supplier will be able to give you temporary credit if you can’t afford to top up your meter. They might add this to your meter automatically, but if they don’t, you can call them and ask them to do this.
 
If you run out of temporary credit, speak to your supplier to explain your situation. They may give you extra temporary credit if you’re struggling with living costs. There are other reasons why they might give you extra credit too, including if you’re disabled, have a long-term health condition, or you have children under the age of 5. You’ll have to pay back anything extra you get, but you can agree how to do this in a way you can afford with your supplier.
 
As you say, the cost of living is really high but there is help available. If you pay council tax and you’re in bands A-D, you should get a payment of £150 automatically. It could take until the end of September, but if you've not had it already you might need to make a claim. You can check how to do this on your council's website.
 
You might also be able to get a fuel voucher, which you can use to add credit to your meter. Contact us or your local council about this.
 
There’s more government support coming from October, including a £400 payment to help you with your energy bills. If you have a prepayment meter, you’ll be given vouchers in the first week of each month from October, via SMS text, email or post. Make sure your energy company has your up-to-date details.
 
To help manage other costs, it’s also worth checking you’re getting all the benefits you’re entitled to. There are benefits calculators you can use online. On the Citizens Advice website, there’s advice on how to reduce living costs and information on other ways to increase your income.
 
The school holidays can be a really tough time and we know the food shop isn’t stretching as far. Contact Wiltshire Council to find out what extra support you can get over the holidays. If you can’t afford to buy food, we can help you get a referral for a food bank.
 
We know this is an extremely worrying time and everyone’s situation is different. Don’t struggle alone. If you need further support, contact us on freephone: 0800 144 8848.
Lines are open Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm (closed on bank holidays); or you can email us
 
Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website

July 2022
I’m due to fly to Spain during the school summer holidays. After hearing about all the problems at airports, I’m really worried. My family have been looking forward to this and it’s cost us a lot of money. What do we do if our flight is cancelled or delayed?
 
A lot of people will be worried after seeing the recent news about flights. If you face issues, the Citizens Advice website has lots of information about what to do when your flight is delayed or cancelled.
 
If you’re already at the airport when they announce the delay, the airline should give you food and drink, access to phone calls and emails. You should also get accommodation if you’re delayed overnight (including journeys to and from the airport).
 
Your airline might offer you vouchers to pay for these or advise you to keep receipts to claim back expenses later. They will only refund ‘reasonable’ expenses, not expensive meals or luxury hotels.
 
What counts as a long enough delay to get this help depends on how long your flight is. A short flight only needs to be delayed two hours, whereas a flight of more than 3,500km needs to be more than four hours. Full details are on the Citizens Advice website.
 
It’s worth knowing that if your flight is delayed for more than five hours, you don’t have to take it. The airline legally has to give you a full refund for that flight (and any onward flights and return flights if you’re part-way through a connecting journey). Talk to someone from the airline as soon as you decide you don’t want to fly.
 
If your flight is cancelled altogether, you’ve a legal right to either a full refund or a replacement flight to get you to your destination. The refund includes any onward flights and money for a return flight if you’re part-way through a connecting journey. Ask about this at the airport if you can.
 
Don’t just rebook another flight yourself - check with the airline first because it’s their responsibility to sort out your replacement. If you do have to rebook it yourself, keep any receipts and evidence of why the airline couldn’t do this for you, for example screenshots of live chats. If the cancellation ends up delaying you getting to your holiday by two or more hours, you’re entitled to help with costs.
 
Check if you’re entitled to compensation for a delayed or cancelled flight. Again, this will depend on how long the delay was, the distance, and whether it’s the airline’s fault.
The Citizens Advice website has details on claiming compensation for delays or cancellations from the airline. You might also be able to claim from your travel insurance – check if your policy covers this.
 
If you have a problem with an airline and you’re not sure what to do, call the Citizens Advice consumer helpline 0808 223 1133 or talk to an adviser online through the Citizens Advice website.
 
Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website

June 2022

I’ve got loads of problems with my house that I’ve been putting off fixing - a faulty boiler, a window that won’t shut properly, broken light fittings. The list goes on! I want to sort it out but I’ve had bad experiences with dodgy builders in the past. How do I find someone I can trust?

Making home improvements can be stressful, but there are a few steps you can follow to help it go smoothly.

First, find a Trading Standards ‘approved trader’. You can look for one in your area online or use the Government’s approved trader scheme TrustMark.

It’s also worth checking if they’re a current member of a trade body. Trade bodies have codes of practice and can help resolve problems if things go wrong. Ask who they’re registered with and then check the trade body’s website.

For any gas and electric fixes, only use certified traders - it’s dangerous to use someone who doesn’t know what they’re doing. You can check the Gas Safe Register for a list of traders and use a registered electrician who can certify their own work.

It’s always helpful to get references or recommendations where possible. Ask your friends, family or neighbours if they know of anyone they’d recommend. You can also ask the person you hire for examples of work they’ve carried out in the past. Try to avoid contractors who won’t give references - it’s a sign they could be dishonest.

When you find someone, ask for a written quote - this is different to an estimate. A quote is legally binding and the tradesperson can’t change it without a good reason - for example, if you ask for extra work to be done. It’s worth comparing quotes from several contractors to make sure you’re getting a fair price.

Next, get a written contract. This should cover exactly what you’re paying for and everything you’ve agreed on, including timings, payments, who will pay for materials and any subcontractors if needed. When it comes to payment, it’s best to opt to pay in stages rather than upfront. Try to pay by card if you can - this can give you extra safeguards if something goes wrong.

Finally, make sure your trader is fully insured. Keep copies of receipts and your written contract. These will be important as evidence if things go wrong. It’s also helpful to take photos of any problems if they arise.

If you have a problem with a contractor and you’re not sure what to do, call the Citizens Advice consumer helpline 0808 223 1133 or talk to an adviser online through the Citizens Advice website.

Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website


May 2022

I recently applied for a job at a local pub which offered National Minimum Wage. I did a short interview and at the end the manager asked me for some documents and also how old I was. After telling her I was 25 she told me she would be in touch, but it would be unlikely I’d get the job because they wouldn’t be able to afford to pay me the required wage. She said she would prefer to hire someone younger. Is this legal?

Nobody should be asking you how old you are in a job interview. Being 25, you’re entitled to the National Living Wage. On the Citizens Advice website there are full details of the wages people are entitled to by law. But these rules shouldn’t mean employers avoid hiring people because of how old they are. That’s known as ‘direct age discrimination’ in the Equality Act 2010. You’re also protected by the National Minimum Wage Act 1998, which says employers can’t not hire you (and they can’t fire you) because your age means you’re entitled to a higher rate.

We have a lot of information on our website about what to do if you’re being treated unfairly when applying for a job. If you’ve been discriminated against, there are steps you can take to either get compensation or convince the person to give you a job.

Make a note of what happened as soon as you can - noting down exactly what you were asked and any other remarks the interviewer made. This will be useful as evidence later.

Next, you should write a letter of complaint to the employer. Keep a copy of this letter for your own records. There’s advice on the Citizens Advice website on what this letter should include and you can also speak to an adviser at your local Citizens Advice to get help writing it.

If the letter doesn’t get an outcome you’re happy with, you could take the employer to an employment tribunal. You’ll need as much evidence of discrimination as possible. Evidence should include the job advert, the job description, your notes about what was said at the interview and any contact you’ve had with the employer since - like your complaint letter.

Remember that you only have three months minus one day from the date that the ‘discriminatory act’ (in this case, the comments in your interview) happened to start tribunal proceedings. You do this by contacting the government organisation Acas and telling them that you intend to bring a claim.

Nobody should have to worry about being discriminated against when job hunting. For more advice on your rights when searching for work, visit citizensadvice.org.uk/work or call us on 0800 144 8848.

Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website. 


April 2022

I am a single parent, with two young children. I am already struggling to stay on top of my household bills; my weekly food shop isn’t stretching as far anymore and now my energy bill is going up too. I don’t know how I’m going to afford all of these price rises. What can I do to stop my finances spiralling out of control?

First of all, you are not alone in this and there’s support to help you.

It’s always worth checking if there are benefits you don’t know about that you’re eligible for, including support with your energy costs and living costs. On the Citizens Advice website there’s a benefits calculator, advice on how to reduce living costs and information on other ways to increase your income.

There’s also emergency support that you may have access to, such as food bank vouchers or fuel vouchers. You could contact your local council to see if they could also offer support. You can find more details about some of the local Wiltshire support here.

If you’re struggling to stay on top of bills, it’s really important to understand what money you have coming in and going out each month. Citizens Advice has a budgeting tool on its website that can help with this.

And if you’re already behind on bills, prioritise paying your rent or mortgage, plus energy bills and Council Tax first. Not paying these bills has the most serious consequences. You should speak to the person or company you owe money to, to see if they can help you repay your bills sustainably.

We know that times are incredibly tough but please remember, you don’t have to face this alone, do contact your local Citizens Advice, to help you find a way forward.

Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website. 


March 2022

I love live music and now that restrictions have lifted, I’m keen to start going to events again. I’ve booked tickets for some gigs over the next few months, but I’m still a little worried. I can’t quite believe things are fully back to normal. What will happen if restrictions come back in?

It’s understandable to be feeling apprehensive when there’s been so much change, and knowing your rights will help you deal with anything unexpected.

If you’ve got tickets to an event which goes ahead, but you change your mind about going or realise you’re no longer able to go, you have no legal right to a refund. However, if the event is cancelled, your right to a refund will depend on how you bought the ticket.

If you booked through an official seller and the organiser cancels, moves, reschedules, or makes the event behind closed doors, you should get a refund. This is true even if it’s cancelled due to a government ban on large events. If this happens, contact the official seller to find out how you can get a refund.

If you bought your ticket from a ticket-reselling website, your refund will depend on the site's terms and conditions. If you’re worried about the event being cancelled, it’s a good idea to look at the terms and conditions before booking.

If you bought from a private seller, unfortunately it’s unlikely you’ll be able to recover your money, even if the event is cancelled or rescheduled. We recommend contacting the seller to see what they can do.

Ahead of any events you’ve booked, keep checking the information from the official seller or organiser to make sure you know straight away about any updates, like changes to the date or cancellations.

Another thing to be aware of is that scammers exploit these situations for their own benefit. If your event is cancelled and anyone - whether it’s a person or a company - offers their services to try to recover money on your behalf, be suspicious. Make sure that you're aware of the signs of a potential scam and always be on the lookout.

If you need more information on how to get a refund, take a look at the Citizens Advice website.

Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website. 


February 2022

I’ve just been offered a new job and now I need to tell my current employer. The new company wants me to start as soon as possible. The problem is, we’re already a bit short-staffed where I am now and I don’t know how soon I’ll be allowed to leave. How should I bring all this up with my boss?

Congratulations on your new role. It can feel awkward telling your current employer you’re moving on. The time between telling your employer you’ve found a new position and you actually leaving is known as your notice period.

If you’ve been in your current job for less than a month, you won’t have to give any notice period (unless your contract says otherwise). If it’s more than a month, you’ll have to give at least one week’s notice. Your contract should make it clear exactly how long is expected.

If you don’t have a contract, and your employer has no written record of you agreeing to a notice period, you should give at least one week’s notice.

It’s worth waiting until your new employer has confirmed your employment, for example by giving you a start date before handing in your resignation. It’s then best to resign in writing (email is fine), so that you have a record of the date you told your employer. On the Citizens Advice website we have a page on handing in your notice with tips on how to write this letter.

You can work a longer notice than the one in your contract, if you agree it with your employer. If you’re keen to move on sooner rather than later, it may also be possible to negotiate a shorter notice period than your contract says. If you want to go down this route, it can be useful to reassure your current employer that you will tackle any urgent work before finishing.

Fixed-term contracts are a bit different, as you won’t need to give notice if you intend to leave on the last day of contract. Leaving early would usually mean giving at least one week’s notice, unless your contract says otherwise.

Don’t forget about your holiday days during your notice period. If you have unused paid holiday you should speak to your employer about either taking these during the notice period or being paid for them.

Finally, sometimes people can change their mind about moving jobs or find their circumstances alter. If this happens to you, you should speak to your current employer to see what the options are and if you can stay in your current role.

Everyone’s situation is different, but if you face any challenges with an existing or potential employer, contact Citizens Advice for advice: 0800 144 8848 or visit our website pages about what to do when you’re leaving a job.

Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website. 


January 2022
I keep seeing on the news that my bills could be going up soon. It’s making me really worried, especially as I spent more on Christmas than I should have done. How can I get my spending habits back on track in 2022?
 
A lot of people will be asking themselves this question right now. The good news is there are lots of things you can do to be more in control of your money and better prepared for the future.
 
Firstly, find out exactly what money you have coming in and going out each month. Be realistic about what you need for essentials like food and travel. Then you can set yourself a budget that you can stick to - take a look at the budgeting tool on the Citizens Advice website to help you do this.
 
If any of your bills do go up in the coming year, you can go back to our budgeting tool anytime to create a new plan and stay in control. Our website tips on how to reduce your regular living costs may be helpful if you find you have more money going out than coming in at any point.
 
You should also make sure you’re getting all the income you’re entitled to. Use the income checker on the Citizens Advice website to see if you could be getting more support, such as benefits or government grants. You can also use this to make sure you’re being paid the right wage.
 
If you’ve been using credit cards, your overdraft or store cards for your spending, it’s understandable if these debts are causing you worry. It’s important to prioritise paying your rent or mortgage, plus energy bills and Council Tax first though. Not paying these has the most serious consequences. On the Citizens Advice website, we have advice about which bills you need to prioritise and the support available for paying these and other bills.
 
Once you have planned how to pay your priority bills, the budgeting tool can help you plan how to repay credit cards, overdraft charges and store cards.
 
Need advice on managing personal finances or debt?
Everyone’s circumstances are different, particularly when it comes to managing personal finances. If you need more specific support or don’t feel able to manage your situation alone, call our debt helpline: 0800 240 4420. You’re not on your own.
 
Need advice about something else?
We're here to help: 
 
To speak to an adviser over the phone call us on freephone 0800 144 88 48 
Lines are open Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm

Or contact us directly for advice by email
 
Copyright Citizens Advice. For the most up-to-date advice, please visit the Citizens Advice website. 

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